The Powell River Regional District signed on with Multi-Materials BC (MMBC) and changed the way rural residents recycle as of May, 2014. Businesses that supply packaging and printed paper (PPP) to BC residents are now responsible for collecting and managing these materials so they can be recycled. MMBC, a non-profit organization working on behalf of these businesses, will be responsible for residential recycling programs in a number of communities across BC, including the Powell River Regional District. These businesses will pay fees to MMBC to cover the recycling cost of PPP. This service is for the collection of residential PPP only.

In early 2016, the Powell River Regional District conducted a 3 month feasibility pilot project providing free recycling services for all Industrial, Commercial and Institutional (ICI) operators at the Town Centre Recycling Depot only. The data collected from this pilot project is now under review. At this time, we will continue to offer this free recycling service for ICI operators at the Town Centre Recycling Depot until a final decision regarding the feasibility of continuing this service is made by the Regional District Board of Directors. Sunshine Disposal & Recycling (4484 Franklin Ave.) also accept some commercial recycling, including paper, cardboard, and #2 plastic. Commercial metal can be brought to any scrap metal dealer free of charge.

Powell River residents can drop off MMBC accepted items free of charge at one of the Regional District’s recycling depots located throughout the community. For further details on the MMBC program and what can be recycled go to recyclinginbc.ca. Check out this YouTube Video showing What Happens To Your MMBC Recycling. The Regional District and the Let’s Talk Trash team (public education team) continue to work with outside organizations to add new items that can be recycled at our depots. Newly implemented collection at select depots included: cork, batteries, cellphones, pens, markers, highlighters, Ziplock bags, small appliances, cracker and cookie plastic overwrap & freshness seals, and clothing (including clothing, accessories, shoes, bedding and towels regardless of condition). See depot details below for a list of what additional items are recyclable at each depot. If you have any questions about the additional collection items, please contact the Let’s Talk Trash team at 604 485-0020 or email letstalktrashteam@gmail.com.

Recycling Depots
All MMBC depots are fully fenced and staffed and are only open during specific hours of operation. Depots are closed on holidays. If a holiday falls on a day that a depot is not open for business, the following day that the depot is meant to be open will be taken off in lieu of the statutory holiday.

Contact for Recycling Depot Operation and to Report Illegal Dumping
Sunshine Disposal & Recycling
4484 Franklin Avenue
Powell River, BC
Phone: 604 485-0167

Depot Name and Location Days and Hours of Operation Additional Items
Town Centre
(behind Rona Building Centre)
Tuesdays to Saturdays
8:00 am – 5:30 pm
  • cork
  • batteries
  • cellphones
  • pens
  • markers
  • highlighters
  • Ziplock bags
  • small appliances
  • cracker & cookie overwrap
  • clothing
Tla’amin (Sliammon) Salish Centre Tuesdays to Saturdays
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
  • cork
  • batteries
  • cellphones
  • pens
  • markers
  • highlighters
  • clothing
Lund
(behind Lund Hotel)
Wednesdays to Saturdays
10:00 am – 4:30 pm
  • cork
  • batteries
  • cellphones
  • pens
  • markers
  • highlighters
  • clothing
Black Point Store
(south of town)
Tuesdays to Saturdays
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
  • cork
  • batteries
  • cellphones
  • pens
  • markers
  • highlighters
Gillies Bay, Texada Island
(Texada Community Hall)
Wednesdays, Fridays & Saturdays
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
  • clothing
Van Anda, Texada Island
(across Gillies Bay Road from the gas station)
(Satellite MMBC depot)
Tuesdays & Thursdays
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Lasqueti Island
(on Main Road at the free store)
Caretaker: Robyn Dryburgh at
250 228-2284
(As of April 1, 2016, this facility is no longer
being run as an MMBC depot.)
Mondays and Thursdays from 1 pm to
5 pm from April 1 to October 1 and
Thursdays only from October 2 to
March 31
  • free store accepts clean clothes and unbroken reusable goods

 

Augusta Recyclers also operates an MMBC recycling depot at 7346 Highway 101 (one quarter mile south of the Beach Garden’s Resort) Mondays to Saturdays from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm.

The City of Powell River has a bi-weekly curbside pick-up of recyclable materials.  See program details.


Disposal of Hazardous Waste Items

Certain household hazardous waste items can be dropped off at Augusta Recyclers. Click this link for a list of accepted materials and their rates for disposal.

Texada Island Transfer Station
Scrap metal can be dropped off at the Texada Island Transfer Station at 6529 Shelter Point Road (turn left onto Shelter Point Road off of Gillies Bay Road at Shelter Point Park and follow the road towards Central Road for approximately 2 km – station is on the left hand side of the road) on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday and the 2nd and 4th Saturday each month from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. No charge for scrap metal drop offs.  Caretaker is Wade Chisholm at 604 413-2176.

Go to Garbage Collection & Disposal for information about the Lasqueti Island Landfill/Transfer Site.

See the Waste Wise Recycling Directory for information on where to drop off other specific recyclable items.


Extended Producer Responsibility

Extended producer responsibility (EPR) is defined as a policy approach in which a producer’s responsibility, physical and/or financial, for a product is extended to the post-consumer stage of a product’s life cycle. EPR shifts responsibility upstream in the product life cycle to the producer and away from municipalities. As a policy approach it provides incentives to producers to incorporate environmental considerations in the design of their products. EPR also shifts the historical public sector tax-supported responsibility for some waste to the individual brand owner, manufacturer or first importer.

Also known as product stewardship, EPR uses financial incentives to encourage manufacturers to design environmentally-friendly products by holding producers liable for the costs of managing their products at end of life. This tactic attempts to relieve local governments of the costs of managing certain priority products by forcing manufacturers to internalize the cost of recycling within the product price. EPR promotes that producers (usually brand owners) have the greatest control over product design and marketing and therefore have the greatest ability and responsibility to reduce toxicity and waste.

For more information on which products are covered by EPR or product stewardship programs, please visit letstalktrashpr.com/epr/.